Reformers Blog — Book Review

Book Review: Augustine on the Christian Life

Posted by Thomas Eglinton on

One highlight of Bray’s work is that he doesn’t hide Augustine’s imperfections – Augustine was wrong and mislead in many areas – but Bray also doesn’t write Augustine off because of them.

Read more →

Book Review: Particular Redemption

Posted by Thomas Eglinton on

John Elias wrote the preface to this publication, and declared: “The doctrine presented and defended here is of the greatest import. It contains the sum and substance of the gospel.” Few evangelicals today would write in such terms but they would do well to work through Hurrion’s thorough treatment of the subject. Hurrion deals with almost every conceivable objection, and shows us that Christ came to save, not just to make salvation possible. The result is a work that is clear, comprehensive and convincing

Read more →

Book Review: Popes and Feminists

Posted by Thomas Eglinton on

The Reformers taught women that all lawful occupations can be ‘holy’ when done unto the Lord. This freed women like Katharina Luther and Katherine Zell to carry out the thankless jobs in the home and to focus their energies on bringing up a godly future generation. Their husbands were freed to spend themselves creating change in the Church. Elise gives numerous examples of women who had a large impact by doing mundane ‘unholy’ tasks as to the Lord.

Read more →

Reformers Review: The Gospel Comes With a House Key by Rosaria Butterfield

Posted by Thomas Eglinton on

I think many of us (if not all) yearn for a Christianity like the one Rosaria describes. The Gospel Comes with a House Key finishes with the question 'what if?'. What if Christian's lived 'radically ordinary hospitable' lives where they genuinely cared for and loved their neighbours, opening their homes and hearts? Well, in to some extent, this book answers that question.

Read more →

Book Review: The Next Story

Posted by Thomas Eglinton on

At each turn I found myself feeling like my eyes had been opened to why it is that I sometimes feel the way I do about the digital technologies in my life. Tim puts into words those niggling issues we have with technology, explains what they are, where they come from and then gives you the tools to deal with them.

Read more →