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How to Read a Book - Inspectional Reading Type 1: Skimming or Pre-reading

Posted by Thomas Eglinton on

Here Adler comes to the first really practical advise about how to read a book. He advises the reader on how to pre-read a book. Before we go through the detail of Adler's advise, we must first ask the question 'why pre-read a book?' Here at Reformers Bookshop we know more than most that there are far too many books in the world to read all of them. And that fact alone is enough to warrant pre-reading. Adler notes that before we read a book, we must first determine whether or not we want to read it. Does it contain...

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How to Read a Book - 4 Types of Reading

Posted by Thomas Eglinton on

The next principle that Adler covers is the different levels of reading. He presents 4 levels: Elementary, Inspectional, Analytical and Syntopical.

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When Christianity Meets Psychology by Chris Cipollone

Posted by Thomas Eglinton on

Made in the image of God, even non-Christian psychologists will exhibit his wisdom with what they have learned about the brain which he has designed. But theirs, like ours, is a wisdom that is seen through veiled lenses.

And so, we would be wise to engage in what psychology has taught us about matters of mental health. But true biblical counselling means that when psychology contradicts scripture, we must believe and trust that God’s ways are higher and greater.

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How to Read a Book - The Original Communicators

Posted by Thomas Eglinton on

The implication of all  this is that we really should be wanting to find the ‘original communicators’ of truth. And as our society documents more and more knowledge in books, it will become more and more true that the primary original communicators are ‘dead teachers’ in books and ‘live teachers’ are simply secondary communicators regurgitating what they have learnt from the books.

That is, we should want to find the great books of old. This strikes me as interesting because, yet again, Mortimer is touching on a Christian concept. We love the old, old book and should always desire to go back to the ‘original communicator’, the Word of God.

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How to Read a Book - Two Ways of Learning

Posted by Thomas Eglinton on

This gives us a glimpse into what it means to read for understanding. It means to not only remember what the author is saying but to understand why he is saying it and what he means. It means really engaging with an author and thinking through the set of knowledge put forward in the book. It means considering how the author’s point relates to other information you may know, the perspectives of other authors, your own experience of the world and, perhaps as a Christian, you can add how it relates to what God says in the Bible.

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